en English

When should I worry ? – Red Flag quick guide Adults and Children

The following should be used as a guide by Patients and GP Reception Staff to identify when a patient should be sent straight to A&E or urgent care – and not wait to see a GP.

EYES: Sudden loss of vision, foreign body in the eye, trauma resulting in rapid swelling, any chemical injury – direct patient straight to A&E

MOUTH: Signs of anaphylaxis / allergic reaction – rapid lip and tongue swelling, wheezing, difficulty breathing – 999/ direct patient straight to A&E

THROAT: Any difficulty breathing, very noisy breathing, unable to swallow own saliva – direct patient straight to A&E EARS: Any bleeding from ear(s), any bruising behind the ear(s) – direct patient straight to A&E

CHEST / BREATHING: Any noisy breathing, struggling to speak in full sentences – 999/ direct patient straight to A&E

Child – any sucking under ribcage when breathing / very fast breathing – 999/ direct patient straight to A&E

HEART / CHEST PAIN: Any fast heartbeat that is making the patient feel unwell – 999 / direct patient straight to A&E Central crushing chest pain, radiating to left arm or jaw, associated with nausea and/or vomiting or sweating and feeling very unwell – 999 / direct patient straight to A&E

SUSPECTED SEPSIS: If patient is saying they feel very unwell, please ask the following questions:

S: Shivering / hot / cold

E: Extreme pain or general discomfort

P: Pale or discoloured skin

S: Sleepy, difficulty waking and/or any confusion

I: Patient feeling very unwell ‘I feel like I might die’

S: Short of breath

ABDOMINAL PAIN: Patient says tummy feels very hard to touch and very painful. Patient complains of recurrent vomiting, high fever, and extreme abdominal pain, sweaty / clammy – 999 / direct patient straight to A&E.